22nd July 2014

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22nd July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1
13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 
"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano
After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.
Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.
As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 
This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee houses, Colombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  
As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.
The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).
Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 
Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 
Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 
As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 

World Cup 2014.  Argentina 0 - Germany 1

13 July 2014, 3:00 pm. Rio Plata Bakery, Elmhurst 

"Few things happen in Latin America that do not have some direct or indirect relation with soccer. Whether it’s something we celebrate together, or a shipwreck that takes us all down, soccer counts in Latin America, sometimes more than anything else." - Eduardo Galeano

After an amazing month of matches being played in Brazil and watched all over New York City, we headed for the intersection of Junction and Corona in Queens to catch the climactic final between Argentina and Germany.

Foolishly thinking we could get a seat at a local steakhouse/butcher if we came three hours prior to kickoff, we arrived to find hundreds of drum-playing, Malvinas-defending, and air horn-blowing la Albiceleste supporters spilling out of each and every Argentinian establishment in the area and converging in the street in great anticipation of a potential third star.

As the start of the game got closer we temporarily satiated ourselves with baked empanadas and dark chocolate alfajores from a nearby grocery store and came to the conclusion that, like the hundreds and hundreds of other sky blue festooned fans, we would be watching the final in the street by peering at the glare-y TV inside Rio Plata Bakery. 

This, of course, added to the overall final experience and ended up being a fitting conclusion to our month watching the 2014 World Cup with various fans at unconventional NYC spots that included everything from Cameroonian diplomatic missions, Algerian-run Italian coffee housesColombian hair salons, Ivorian cabbie hangouts, Japanese conveyor belt sushi spots, and Uruguayan bakeries.  

As the match began we found ourselves wedged in on the crowded street between Argentinian men, women, and children of all ages who were jostling for some semblance of a vantage point towards the TV in the overflowing bakery.

The mood was festive with dozens of drummers, face-painting on offer, and the now infamous Argentinian chant being sung, set to the tune of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Bad Moon Rising, that taunts the host nation, “Brazil, decime qué se siente, tener en casa tu papa” (Brazil, tell me how it feels, to be bossed around in your own home).

Argentina had their chances in the first half, attacking with pace down the wings and putting pressure on Germany’s right back. Leo Messi uncharacteristically fired wide on a breakaway after a lovely through pass from Gonzalo Higuain, squandering an excellent opportunity. Higuain himself then missed one of the sitters of the tournament after a Tony Kroos error before having another converted chance disallowed. 

Germany had more chances in the second half but the stalemate continued until the end of regulation. In extra time Mario Götze provided the one moment of decisive brilliance that settled the Cup, a wonderful left foot finish in the 113th minute that stunned the Argentinians in Elmhurst. 

Argentina had one final chance to tie it up and force PKs, a Messi free kick just outside the box. As he lined up the crowd in Queens began to chant his name as we had all seen him bury such chances so many times before. Sadly, the world’s best player skyed his attempt, sending a wild shot way over the bar and effectively sealing Germany’s fourth World Cup. 

As we walked home trying to hail a cab we talked about the game, Argentina’s missed chances, and the sadness that permeated the neighborhood. Ultimately, however, we talked about how much the World Cup means beyond Elmhurst, beyond Queens, beyond NYC, beyond Argentina, beyond Germany, beyond Latin America, and beyond Europe. It is a global spectacle that connects humanity to itself and then back again; unmatched and unforgettable. Only four more years… 

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16th July 2014

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16th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  
World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  
World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  
World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  

World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 

9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square

The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.

Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 

It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.

And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.

La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  

 ·  1 notes

16th July 2014

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16th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.

World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 

8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay

We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.

With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.

Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.

The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.

We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.

 ·  2 notes

This mélange of Germanic power and multiethnic prowess derives from the soccer academy system, which was overhauled a decade ago to not just create finishing schools for talented teens, but as a means of integrating foreign styles and attitudes into German culture … (and) the drafting of revised immigration laws in 2000 signaled a cultural shift that spread to soccer once foreign flair began to flood the academies.

- James Tyler, The New Germans
 ·  1 notes

9th July 2014

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9th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 

4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City

For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.

The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.

A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.

We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 

The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.

An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     

Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 

The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 

Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 

As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 

 ·  3 notes

They had decided to quit their current teams in order to create a new national team for the place of their birth: the French colony of Algeria. Before each game the flag of the Algerian revolution asserted that despite France’s refusal to accept its independence, the nation of Algeria truly did exist. So it was that Algeria’s first football team was born in a gesture of revolt.

 ·  3 notes

If, as Paul Auster once wrote, “Countries now wage their battles on the soccer field with surrogate armies in short pants,” then Brazil 2014 represents a new battle for Greece. One that at a time of crisis carries an importance that transcends beyond the limits of the soccer field; one that can transform fear and pessimism back into hope and enthusiasm, two of the elements that pushed the underdogs of Euro 2004 into becoming champions.

- Achilles Kallergis, Greek fans hope to relive 2004

24th June 2014

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24th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  

World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 

21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx

The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 

Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  

At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.

After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 

Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.

Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   

Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  

 ·  3 notes

As ‘Croatians’, athletes were obliged to fight a lofty battle for Croatia, it was their way of fighting for Croatian independence and participating in building national identity. Sport adopted the function of a key symbol for creating a distinctive Croatian nationhood with athletes continuously arguing that competing on behalf of the nation was more than ‘just’ sport.

20th June 2014

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20th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 

17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria

Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…

"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 

"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."

"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 

18th June 2014

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18th June 2014

World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 
World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 
World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 
World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 
World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 
World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 
World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 
World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 
15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 
Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.
A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 
At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 
As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 
Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 
In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral. 
Football, bloody hell. 

World Cup 2014. Ecuador 1 - Switzerland 2 

15 June 2014, 12:00 pm. El Pequeño Coffee Shop, Jackson Heights 

Chanting “Chucho, Chucho, Chucho,” in memory of their tragically deceased striker, the Ecuadorian community in Queens demonstrated a large, emotional show of force in Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Corona on Sunday.

A day after Colombia fans turned the area into a sea of yellow, local Ecuadorian fans did the same as they filled nearly every cafe, bar, and space surrounding parked food trucks on Roosevelt Avenue and Junction Boulevard. 

At El Pequeño Coffee Shop, the mood was jubilant from the start with flags being waved, air horns being sounded, and songs being sung as over a hundred fans and even an Ecuadorian TV crew crowded around the deceivingly-named restaurant’s large space. 

As massive bowls of spicy encebollado de pescado, tart maracuyá juices, thin steaks, and strong cafe con leches were consumed, Enner Valencia’s 22nd minute header sent the crowd into a frenzy. 

Admir Mehmedi capitalized on sloppy marking shortly after the break to level it up for the Swiss and set up a nervy finish for the Ecuadorian fans in Queens. 

In perhaps the most deflating, cruel last few minutes of the tournament thus far, Ecuador missed an injury time opportunity, and, on the very next counter attack, Haris Seferović converted in the dying seconds turning the once electric and noisy El Pequeño to a de facto funeral.

Football, bloody hell. 

I was scared for him so I told him, “Calm down, Dad, don’t overreact.” He answered: “If you had lived the last 50 years I have been waiting for this moment, you’d be here crying with me!” He cried for a long time. I sat beside him and I felt happy for him. We have never again said that we played as we never would, but we lost as we always do. Ecuador is going to its third World Cup.

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