This mélange of Germanic power and multiethnic prowess derives from the soccer academy system, which was overhauled a decade ago to not just create finishing schools for talented teens, but as a means of integrating foreign styles and attitudes into German culture … (and) the drafting of revised immigration laws in 2000 signaled a cultural shift that spread to soccer once foreign flair began to flood the academies.

- James Tyler, The New Germans
 ·  1 notes

As ‘Croatians’, athletes were obliged to fight a lofty battle for Croatia, it was their way of fighting for Croatian independence and participating in building national identity. Sport adopted the function of a key symbol for creating a distinctive Croatian nationhood with athletes continuously arguing that competing on behalf of the nation was more than ‘just’ sport.

For much of its football history Chile has had something of an identity problem.Chile was an early adopter of football in South America but the game there failed to develop in the way it did in Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. Chile’s geographical isolation on the “wrong” side of the Andes combined with organisational turmoil to hinder the game’s development for decades.

 ·  1 notes

25th May 2014

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25th May 2014

Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     
Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     
Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     
Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     
Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     
Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     
Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     
Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1
24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea
If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  
During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    
The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  
The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  
It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  
Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  
It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    
The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     

Champions League Final. Real Madrid 4 - Atletico Madrid 1

24 May 2014, 2:45 pm. The Spanish Benevolent Society of New York, Chelsea

If one can resist or simply did not arrive early enough for both the match and tapas consisting of seafood paella, glazed Pincho Moruno skewers, or heavenly dates stuffed with almonds, blue cheese, and wrapped in bacon at La Nacional, there is always the upstairs of the establishment’s owner, the Spanish Benevolent Society of New York.  

During the Champions League Final in Lisbon, Atletico Madrid stood toe to toe with its cross-town, more illustrious rival Real Madrid and who better to host the match locally than the Spanish Benevolent Society Of New York (SBS).    

The SBS was established in 1868 with the first flood of Spaniard emigrants, who sought to establish themselves in the rapidly increasing pan-American city of New York as merchants, cigar makers, longshoreman, and dockworkers. Founded as a social club that develops educational programs, promotes exchange programs with Spanish youth, and hosts social events, their history is old and their vast photographic archive is testament to their preserved culture and identity in NYC. Presently, Spain is dealing with an unemployment rate of 54 percent of people less than 25 years of age. The SBS is still a critical resource for the contemporary Spaniard emigrant seeking to build a career, live abroad, or have a New York City adventure.  

The SBS, Real, and Atletico were all formed before the Second World War, but all three truly gained their identity in the post WWII era, where Spanish emigrants became exiles, Real became Franco’s “precious team” and Atletico one of the “rebels” of the state like the Basque and Catalan clubs (Atletico was founded by Basque students) at first, but then at times veered far to the right. However, at the SBS, all is one and the tense history of el derbi Madrileño was barely noticed. On second thought, this simply may have been due to the sheer domination of Real supporters. However tame the atmosphere was inside in the SBS, on the pitch was a different story.  

It was 1 pm and we were already late for the 2:45 kick off. The stairs up to the SBS reception room, where the big screens were housed, were packed and we knew our chances at a decent photo or two were gone. However, all was not lost as the line was merely waiting for a wedding reception to finish so the red and white clad wait staff could enter and soon empty the remaining cervezas de Estrella Galicia and pitchers of sangria. We rushed in, tables were shifted into place and dismantled the stadium seating of loose chairs from the wedding party, and umbrellas, scarves and flags were used as placeholders for late arrivals.  

Atletico started strong and with Real’s keeper, Casillas over zealously coming forward on a goal kick, misjudging the ball, and being caught out and at fault of the 1-0 Atletico lead. The SBS was eerily quiet and if we had not known who the dominant team was in the room, we did now. The match continued in a stalemate of Atletico’s more than aggressive play, where Ronaldo was the focal point of obstruction. However, as Real took the pitch in the second half, they did so with increased attack and focused aggression, dominating possession and shots on goal.  

It was club icon Sergio Ramos who ended up saving the day for Real, keeping them alive at 1-1 in the 93 minute and forcing extra time with a textbook header. Soon after the break, the Welshman Gareth Bale set the scoring momentum with another goal and Atletico soon unraveled, allowing one more to go in and then a final dagger after a penalty shot from Ronaldo, who could not resist immediately removing his shirt and flexing. This showmanship increased the already agitated Atletico coach Diego Simeone, who ran on to the field for the second time, conjuring up the image of a teleovela villain, dressed all in black, making a last stand for his family in this brutally dramatic Champions League Final.    

The final was 4-1 Real.  La decima was realized. The majority of the fans in the SBS were ecstatic and in song, but we couldn’t help but feel for the tireless yet exhausted Atletico supporters. Upon leaving the SBS, there did not seem to be any hard feelings in the room and this can be attributed to and perhaps subsided by the shared experience of Spanish identity as experienced in NYC, especially at Little Spain’s premier landmark in the city     

 ·  1 notes

27th March 2014


Aside from going to Brazil this summer, New York City might well be the best place on earth to experience the passion and diversity of the sport during the World Cup. This includes, of course, the overflowing, beer-soaked soccer pubs that host many of the NYC-based European supporters clubs. But locations like Nevada Smiths, Legends, and Smithfield, while institutions in their own right, tell only a small part of the story of soccer fans in 2014’s New York City, where 37 percent of its residents are foreign-born. 

In the outer boroughs and uptown, it is the community centers, social clubs, bakeries, grocery stores, bars, cafes, and juice stands that represent NYC fan culture in its principal form. Particularly during the World Cup, these locations harness and re-articulate national identity for immigrant communities in the city.
In my time chasing global soccer around the city as a fan, journalist, player, and student, I’ve seen septuagenarian Spanish men spill glasses of rioja on their bemused wives as they jumped on tables at a member’s only social club in Astoria; Ivorian cooks emerge teary-eyed from behind Harlem kitchens after a Yaya Touré belter; Argentinean fans in Elmhurst dance en masse while twirling umbrellas and singing at the top of their lungs; and Algerian supporters block traffic on Steinway Street while blasting Khaled out of flag-adorned SUV’s — to the chagrin of their Egyptian neighbors.
A yellow-clad woman kissed me at a Brazilian nightclub seconds after Il Fenomeno Ronaldo’s 79th-minute winner during the 2002 World Cup final. Her rather intimidating-looking significant other, who I had been standing next to all match, shrugged as he victoriously fist-pumped at the heavens. This made perfect sense to all three of us at the time.
I’ve seen high-ranking UN diplomats blow off important Security Council meetings to watch their teams play against each other. I have seen atheists turn deeply religious and back again during three minute stoppage time periods. I once saw a Senegalese Imam high-five early morning beer-drinkers on East 116th Street after Papa Bouba Diop’s stunner against France. I have witnessed so many contrasting emotions and mood swings played out over multiple 90-minute periods watching international soccer in NYC that they could warrant their own section in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
I have also seen firsthand what historian Eric Hobsbawm meant when he said that “The imagined community of millions seems more real as a team of 11 named people.” Watching their national teams play, immigrant communities in NYC not only feel an acute connection to home, but also a sense of pride that their existence is recognized, albeit for a fleeting moment, both on the international and local stages.
Check out our piece on watching the World Cup in NYC as part of Roads & Kingdoms and Sports Illustrated’s The Far Post series.  
 We have also updated our match itinerary with upcoming fixtures we plan to cover, so stay tuned for new Global Soccer, Global NYC content in the coming weeks.  

Aside from going to Brazil this summer, New York City might well be the best place on earth to experience the passion and diversity of the sport during the World Cup. This includes, of course, the overflowing, beer-soaked soccer pubs that host many of the NYC-based European supporters clubs. But locations like Nevada Smiths, Legends, and Smithfield, while institutions in their own right, tell only a small part of the story of soccer fans in 2014’s New York City, where 37 percent of its residents are foreign-born. 

In the outer boroughs and uptown, it is the community centers, social clubs, bakeries, grocery stores, bars, cafes, and juice stands that represent NYC fan culture in its principal form. Particularly during the World Cup, these locations harness and re-articulate national identity for immigrant communities in the city.
In my time chasing global soccer around the city as a fan, journalist, player, and student, I’ve seen septuagenarian Spanish men spill glasses of rioja on their bemused wives as they jumped on tables at a member’s only social club in Astoria; Ivorian cooks emerge teary-eyed from behind Harlem kitchens after a Yaya Touré belter; Argentinean fans in Elmhurst dance en masse while twirling umbrellas and singing at the top of their lungs; and Algerian supporters block traffic on Steinway Street while blasting Khaled out of flag-adorned SUV’s — to the chagrin of their Egyptian neighbors.
A yellow-clad woman kissed me at a Brazilian nightclub seconds after Il Fenomeno Ronaldo’s 79th-minute winner during the 2002 World Cup final. Her rather intimidating-looking significant other, who I had been standing next to all match, shrugged as he victoriously fist-pumped at the heavens. This made perfect sense to all three of us at the time.
I’ve seen high-ranking UN diplomats blow off important Security Council meetings to watch their teams play against each other. I have seen atheists turn deeply religious and back again during three minute stoppage time periods. I once saw a Senegalese Imam high-five early morning beer-drinkers on East 116th Street after Papa Bouba Diop’s stunner against France. I have witnessed so many contrasting emotions and mood swings played out over multiple 90-minute periods watching international soccer in NYC that they could warrant their own section in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
I have also seen firsthand what historian Eric Hobsbawm meant when he said that “The imagined community of millions seems more real as a team of 11 named people.” Watching their national teams play, immigrant communities in NYC not only feel an acute connection to home, but also a sense of pride that their existence is recognized, albeit for a fleeting moment, both on the international and local stages.
Check out our piece on watching the World Cup in NYC as part of Roads & Kingdoms and Sports Illustrated’s The Far Post series.  
 We have also updated our match itinerary with upcoming fixtures we plan to cover, so stay tuned for new Global Soccer, Global NYC content in the coming weeks.  

Aside from going to Brazil this summer, New York City might well be the best place on earth to experience the passion and diversity of the sport during the World Cup. This includes, of course, the overflowing, beer-soaked soccer pubs that host many of the NYC-based European supporters clubs. But locations like Nevada Smiths, Legends, and Smithfield, while institutions in their own right, tell only a small part of the story of soccer fans in 2014’s New York City, where 37 percent of its residents are foreign-born. 

In the outer boroughs and uptown, it is the community centers, social clubs, bakeries, grocery stores, bars, cafes, and juice stands that represent NYC fan culture in its principal form. Particularly during the World Cup, these locations harness and re-articulate national identity for immigrant communities in the city.

In my time chasing global soccer around the city as a fan, journalist, player, and student, I’ve seen septuagenarian Spanish men spill glasses of rioja on their bemused wives as they jumped on tables at a member’s only social club in Astoria; Ivorian cooks emerge teary-eyed from behind Harlem kitchens after a Yaya Touré belter; Argentinean fans in Elmhurst dance en masse while twirling umbrellas and singing at the top of their lungs; and Algerian supporters block traffic on Steinway Street while blasting Khaled out of flag-adorned SUV’s — to the chagrin of their Egyptian neighbors.

A yellow-clad woman kissed me at a Brazilian nightclub seconds after Il Fenomeno Ronaldo’s 79th-minute winner during the 2002 World Cup final. Her rather intimidating-looking significant other, who I had been standing next to all match, shrugged as he victoriously fist-pumped at the heavens. This made perfect sense to all three of us at the time.

I’ve seen high-ranking UN diplomats blow off important Security Council meetings to watch their teams play against each other. I have seen atheists turn deeply religious and back again during three minute stoppage time periods. I once saw a Senegalese Imam high-five early morning beer-drinkers on East 116th Street after Papa Bouba Diop’s stunner against France. I have witnessed so many contrasting emotions and mood swings played out over multiple 90-minute periods watching international soccer in NYC that they could warrant their own section in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

I have also seen firsthand what historian Eric Hobsbawm meant when he said that “The imagined community of millions seems more real as a team of 11 named people.” Watching their national teams play, immigrant communities in NYC not only feel an acute connection to home, but also a sense of pride that their existence is recognized, albeit for a fleeting moment, both on the international and local stages.

Check out our piece on watching the World Cup in NYC as part of Roads & Kingdoms and Sports Illustrated’s The Far Post series. 

We have also updated our match itinerary with upcoming fixtures we plan to cover, so stay tuned for new Global Soccer, Global NYC content in the coming weeks.  

12th February 2013

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12th February 2013

Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0
10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem
The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.
The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.
Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.
Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.
In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.
At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.
A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.
After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.
Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.
Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.
As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 
Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.
Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.
New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country

Africa Cup of Nations Final. Nigeria 1 – Burkina Faso 0

10 February 2013, 1:30 pm. The Shrine, Harlem

The Burkinabe and Nigerian expatriate communities were out in force for the Africa Cup of Nations final on Sunday afternoon in Harlem at the Burkinabe-owned music venue, The Shrine.

The Shrine was having a viewing party for the match, which couldn’t have been more appropriate for the West African dominated CAF final. The walls are festooned with Burkinabe traditional masks along with 1970s American Afro-centric LPs, which seemed to celebrate and exchange of not only music styles, but also American-African culture.

Despite preliminary worries about the viability of their Ghanaian satellite feed, The Shrine ended up drawing over a hundred fans that crowded around the packed, standing room-only bar to get a glimpse of the continent’s showpiece game on a large screen.

Nigeria came out very strong in the first half, going close on three occasions. Later, Burkina Faso found their rhythm through the omnipresent trickery and velcro-like first touch of player-of-the-tournament Jonathan Pitroipa.

In the 39th minute, a bit of magic from local boy Sunday Mba, who drilled home a golaso after flicking it up to himself on the run, broke the deadlock at Soccer City Stadium and ignited a chorus of cheers from the Super Eagles’ fans in Harlem. Two green-clad supporters even began taunting a dejected Burkina Faso fan by waving their scarves in his sad direction.

At halftime, a small stand near the front of the bar was doing brisk business hawking Burkina Faso football t-shirts as fans stocked up on beers for the final 45.

A Nigerian music promoter also took the opportunity to hop on stage and inform the crowd of an upcoming live performance by Naija artist 9ice at Buka Restaurant in Fort Greene.

After the break, Nigeria’s conservative lead-protectionist tactics gave Burkina Faso an opening as they pressed forward through some neat interplay between Pitroipa and Djakaridja Kone but Les Étalons’ final ball lacked the necessary quality.

Victor Moses’ strong hold-up play and runs for the Super Eagles were a constant threat on the counter, but Burkina Faso maintained their pressure— forcing a few fine saves from Nigerian keeper Vincent Enyeama.

Burkina Faso’s late forays into the Nigerian box continued to prove fruitless in the dying minutes as frustrated Burkinabe waiters and bartenders in Les Étalons kits cursed the screen under their breath in French while taking last-minute beer orders.

As the final whistle blew, the Nigerian fans began jumping up and down and waving green scarves, joyously yelling at the player celebrations on TV, and even hoisting small children up into the air. 

Though, a win by the underdog Burkina Faso would have been appropriate for their Cinderella-like ascension in the Cup, they have created a lasting name for themselves as strong competitors on the continent.

Instead, it was the Nigerians moment to bask in the glory. The Shrine even put on some carefully curated bass-heavy Naija hip-pop music over the very capable speakers and the crowd broke out into spontaneous dance to celebrate the Super Eagles’ third Afcon title and the long-awaited return of the trophy to West Africa for the first time in eleven years.

New York City certainly knows how to do the Africa Cup of Nations.

Cross-posted to Africa is a Country

Reblogged from Global Soccer, Global NYC

 ·  5 notes

There is reason to party. Almost two decades of waiting for Nigeria is over. One of Africa’s most complex countries was united, even if only for a few moments. A reporter on the ground at the Teslim Balogun Stadium in Lagos said, “nothing political, nothing religious matters, only the Super Eagles.”

- Firdose Moonda, Sunday, brilliant Sunday
 ·  1 notes

But Ghana is more specific with regard to a somewhat broader mission. Foreign Minister Nana Akufo-Addo, in a press briefing, said that the Black Stars are “not just representing the nation but Africa.” Ghana’s officials, the players themselves and in fact also those reporting about events around the World Cup attribute a
role of ambassador of Africa in the world to the team and the whole country. This expresses a sense of pan-africanism deeply felt in Ghana founded back in the years of Nkrumah’s reign. In fact, Nkrumah himself is quoted on a West African NGO’s website “Sport’s role in nation-building is multi-faceted: a victory in a major international sporting event is of national importance.”

- Andreas Mehler, Political discourse in football coverage: The cases of Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana
 ·  4 notes
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