18th June 2014

s
s
s

18th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Côte d’Ivoire 2 - Japan 1 
14 June 2014, 9:00 pm. Africa Kine, Harlem
After arriving a few minutes after kickoff to La Savane on 116th, the Ivorian fans spilling up the block and packed into the restaurant indicated that we needed a back up viewing destination, quick. Luckily, all we had to do was cross the street 
Walking into Africa Kine restaurant on 116th and Frederick Douglas Boulevard in Harlem, better know as Petite Senegal, immediately transported us to West Africa, one of the regions that inaugurated our love of watching soccer. This area is a special destination for us.  
The crowd at Africa Kine was celebratory in nature with the non-Ivorian West Africans present still cheering for their AFCON brethren, and one large family toasting the college graduation of two of their young members. One generation apart, and they had both proudly achieved college degrees. The spacious dining room was easily housing several large parties enjoying authentic and delicious dishes of chicken yasa, dibi alloco, theibou djeun, and pintade.  
On the TVs above, Les Elephants were battling it out with the Samurai Blue, who took the lead from Keisuke Honda’s slick finish in the 10th minute. This forced the need from a strong tactical response from Les Elephants as they surprisingly took the field at the outset with their great leader brooding on the bench.  
As if Drogba was just the missing piece needed in order to harmonize the attacking line and hold up play, he truly invigorated the team with his entrance in the 62nd minute. Wilfried Bony and Gervinho achieved two goals two minutes apart from one another just moments later, thus clinching the win in the second half for Cote d’Ivoire.
Only Didier Drogba— overstated peacemaker, emcee, villain, diplomatic envoy— could be responsible for winning a match he didn’t start in nor score any goals. Les Elephants are not out of the brush just yet as they face down a dangerous-looking Colombia, a match that will certainly be a test in the days ahead and will bring the Ivorians back onto the uptown streets. 
World Cup 2014.  Côte d’Ivoire 2 - Japan 1 
14 June 2014, 9:00 pm. Africa Kine, Harlem
After arriving a few minutes after kickoff to La Savane on 116th, the Ivorian fans spilling up the block and packed into the restaurant indicated that we needed a back up viewing destination, quick. Luckily, all we had to do was cross the street 
Walking into Africa Kine restaurant on 116th and Frederick Douglas Boulevard in Harlem, better know as Petite Senegal, immediately transported us to West Africa, one of the regions that inaugurated our love of watching soccer. This area is a special destination for us.  
The crowd at Africa Kine was celebratory in nature with the non-Ivorian West Africans present still cheering for their AFCON brethren, and one large family toasting the college graduation of two of their young members. One generation apart, and they had both proudly achieved college degrees. The spacious dining room was easily housing several large parties enjoying authentic and delicious dishes of chicken yasa, dibi alloco, theibou djeun, and pintade.  
On the TVs above, Les Elephants were battling it out with the Samurai Blue, who took the lead from Keisuke Honda’s slick finish in the 10th minute. This forced the need from a strong tactical response from Les Elephants as they surprisingly took the field at the outset with their great leader brooding on the bench.  
As if Drogba was just the missing piece needed in order to harmonize the attacking line and hold up play, he truly invigorated the team with his entrance in the 62nd minute. Wilfried Bony and Gervinho achieved two goals two minutes apart from one another just moments later, thus clinching the win in the second half for Cote d’Ivoire.
Only Didier Drogba— overstated peacemaker, emcee, villain, diplomatic envoy— could be responsible for winning a match he didn’t start in nor score any goals. Les Elephants are not out of the brush just yet as they face down a dangerous-looking Colombia, a match that will certainly be a test in the days ahead and will bring the Ivorians back onto the uptown streets. 
World Cup 2014.  Côte d’Ivoire 2 - Japan 1 
14 June 2014, 9:00 pm. Africa Kine, Harlem
After arriving a few minutes after kickoff to La Savane on 116th, the Ivorian fans spilling up the block and packed into the restaurant indicated that we needed a back up viewing destination, quick. Luckily, all we had to do was cross the street 
Walking into Africa Kine restaurant on 116th and Frederick Douglas Boulevard in Harlem, better know as Petite Senegal, immediately transported us to West Africa, one of the regions that inaugurated our love of watching soccer. This area is a special destination for us.  
The crowd at Africa Kine was celebratory in nature with the non-Ivorian West Africans present still cheering for their AFCON brethren, and one large family toasting the college graduation of two of their young members. One generation apart, and they had both proudly achieved college degrees. The spacious dining room was easily housing several large parties enjoying authentic and delicious dishes of chicken yasa, dibi alloco, theibou djeun, and pintade.  
On the TVs above, Les Elephants were battling it out with the Samurai Blue, who took the lead from Keisuke Honda’s slick finish in the 10th minute. This forced the need from a strong tactical response from Les Elephants as they surprisingly took the field at the outset with their great leader brooding on the bench.  
As if Drogba was just the missing piece needed in order to harmonize the attacking line and hold up play, he truly invigorated the team with his entrance in the 62nd minute. Wilfried Bony and Gervinho achieved two goals two minutes apart from one another just moments later, thus clinching the win in the second half for Cote d’Ivoire.
Only Didier Drogba— overstated peacemaker, emcee, villain, diplomatic envoy— could be responsible for winning a match he didn’t start in nor score any goals. Les Elephants are not out of the brush just yet as they face down a dangerous-looking Colombia, a match that will certainly be a test in the days ahead and will bring the Ivorians back onto the uptown streets. 

World Cup 2014.  Côte d’Ivoire 2 - Japan 1 

14 June 2014, 9:00 pm. Africa Kine, Harlem

After arriving a few minutes after kickoff to La Savane on 116th, the Ivorian fans spilling up the block and packed into the restaurant indicated that we needed a back up viewing destination, quick. Luckily, all we had to do was cross the street 

Walking into Africa Kine restaurant on 116th and Frederick Douglas Boulevard in Harlem, better know as Petite Senegal, immediately transported us to West Africa, one of the regions that inaugurated our love of watching soccer. This area is a special destination for us.  

The crowd at Africa Kine was celebratory in nature with the non-Ivorian West Africans present still cheering for their AFCON brethren, and one large family toasting the college graduation of two of their young members. One generation apart, and they had both proudly achieved college degrees. The spacious dining room was easily housing several large parties enjoying authentic and delicious dishes of chicken yasa, dibi alloco, theibou djeun, and pintade.  

On the TVs above, Les Elephants were battling it out with the Samurai Blue, who took the lead from Keisuke Honda’s slick finish in the 10th minute. This forced the need from a strong tactical response from Les Elephants as they surprisingly took the field at the outset with their great leader brooding on the bench.  

As if Drogba was just the missing piece needed in order to harmonize the attacking line and hold up play, he truly invigorated the team with his entrance in the 62nd minute. Wilfried Bony and Gervinho achieved two goals two minutes apart from one another just moments later, thus clinching the win in the second half for Cote d’Ivoire.

Only Didier Drogba— overstated peacemaker, emcee, villain, diplomatic envoy— could be responsible for winning a match he didn’t start in nor score any goals. Les Elephants are not out of the brush just yet as they face down a dangerous-looking Colombia, a match that will certainly be a test in the days ahead and will bring the Ivorians back onto the uptown streets. 

 ·  1 notes

In 2006 Côte d’Ivoire’s qualification came in the midst of a complex political and military conflict that paralyzed government and stalled development for nearly a decade, and the team became a vital symbol of national unity. During the 2010 World Cup as well, the country was tense, with elections meant to end the crisis just months away. Now, things are settling down; the economy is reviving, and political life, though still marked by the conflict years, is resuming.

 ·  1 notes

The national team means a lot to this country. I think that today - and I choose my words carefully here - it is Cote d’Ivoire’s only unifying force. All our ethnic groups are now represented in the team - Baoules, Betes, and so on. They are all there. So there’s a complete cross-section in the Cote d’Ivoire team and I think that it’s the only good example there is today. We’re trying to move forward, we’re trying to get back on our feet, to show people through football that we can live together.

- Didier Drogba
 ·  10 notes
Load More