30th June 2014

s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

30th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 

World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 

28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights

Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.

With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 

Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 

Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 

Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 

 ·  31 notes

15th June 2014

s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

15th June 2014

World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 
World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 
World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 
World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 
World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 
World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 
World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 
World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  
14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights
16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.
With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 
We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 
After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón
James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 
The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 
As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.
In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 

World Cup 2014. Colombia 3 - Greece 0  

14 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Restaurante Boulevard, Jackson Heights

16 years since Colombia last played a World Cup match, and on the eve of Colombian presidential elections that come at a critical time in the nation’s history, Los Cafeteros took to the pitch in Brazil and their fans took to the streets in Queens.

With more than 80,000 Colombians living in Queens, our walk from 74th and Roosevelt to 86th and Northern Blvd took us past serious intergenerational fan culture, various expressions of Colombian nationalism, a sea of yellow, and pure joy and excitement. 

We saw Ms. Colombia, hung out with a cumbia band, bought knockoff jerseys from the back of a botanica, and saw the NYPD break up an overflowing fan gathering at a chicken spot. 

After getting profiled and sequestered to the devoid-of-fans back of the first lively sports bar we went into after ordering Aguilas, we opted to watch the match alongside over 100 flag-waving Colombians on a large projector screen at Restaurante Boulevard, a dinner theater and local concert venue that cooks a mean chicharrón

James Rodríguez demonstrated his talents from the start and Colombia got off to a dream first half with Pablo Armero’s cool finish in the 5th minute. 

The crowd broke out into song and didn’t stop their vocal support for the next 85 minutes as Colombia dominated the match and put in two more. 

As Rodríguez scored Colombia’s third in the 90th minute, the crowd in Jackson Heights spontaneously went into into an emotional rendition of the Colombian national anthem. Strangers began embracing each other.

In a much-divided country, and for its expatriate community in Queens, this World Cup win was a visceral, however fleeting, national unifying event almost beyond comprehension. The joy was contagious. 

 ·  4 notes

Colombia’s presidential elections – held every four years – usually coincide with the World Cup. The last time Colombia qualified to play in the tournament was France 1998. That year, the presidential runoff was scheduled for Sunday, June 21, the day before Colombia would play Tunisia. …We have had three horrible presidents since then, and we will probably have a runoff this year between two horrible candidates. But, if we can have a day as beautiful as that one, none of that will matter for a while. The country will be happy. The country will be well.

 ·  4 notes

The transnational cultural ties connecting migrants and their places of origin are as varied in form, content and reach as the class and ethnoracial composition of the migration population itself. …Soccer and music, are perhaps the most important ‘national’ symbols, which seem to cross class and regional lines. As one of our informants put it, ‘one of the few things that unite Colombians within and outside the country is soccer.’ Soccer in Colombia generates more followers and interest than almost any other expression of Colombian life.

- Luis Eduardo Guarnizo and Luz Marina Díaz, Transnational migration: a view from Colombia

11th December 2012

s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

11th December 2012

International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 
International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 
International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 
International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 
International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 
International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 
International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 
International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1
14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ
While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.
Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.
"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 
On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 
The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 
Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 

International “Friendly.” Colombia 1 - Brazil 1

14 November 2012, 8 pm. MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford NJ

While not a domestic club rivalry, the recent ‘friendly’ match between the national teams of Colombia and Brazil took place at a fascinating juncture for both teams. Brazil, being Brazil, were tasked with both exercising the demons of the last time they played in the NYC area— a heartbreaking 4-3 loss to arch rivals Argentina in June— as well as building a squad of potential World Cup winners to satisfy the legendarily critical domestic audience on the road to hosting the 2014 World Cup. Colombia, on the other hand, was playing their first friendly match in NYC for years and was eager to demonstrate its soccer resurgence to the heavily Colombian crowd.

Perhaps as a result of public transportation issues still affecting the region following hurricane Sandy in addition to the freezing November temperatures, MetLife Stadium’s attendance for the night only hit 39,000. Still, the Colombian supporters section rocked with every touch, pass, and shot for 90 minutes and dwarfed the noise of the outnumbered Brazilian fans at the match. Aided with smuggled into-the-stadium vuvuzelas, drums, and guacharacas, the multi-generational Colombian fans, many of whom made the pilgrimage to the stadium from Queens, relished the opportunity to cheer on their idols Falcao, James, Yepes, Guarín, and the others that comprise South America’s hottest and the world’s currently 8th ranked team.

"Following la seleccion was one of the earliest ways I began to learn about and celebrate my Colombian identity," said journalist and Colombia fan Monika Fabian. "So attending local friendlies are—and always have been—an extension of that pride. Take my mother, for instance, she’d never say "let’s go see la seleccion." She’d say "let’s go receive la seleccion." Just like you’d receive, or host, relatives. Because that’s kind of what they are as a symbol from home. And to root for Colombia at the stadium is to push the country forward chant by chant." 

On the pitch, Fiorentina midfielder Juan Guillermo Cuadrado struck first for Colombia right before the break. This was followed by an outstanding individual effort by Neymar to tie it up for Brazil in the 64th minute. With ten minutes left, Neymar had the seemingly-assured opportunity to complete his brace and win it for a Brazilian squad playing in their landmark 1,000th match. Instead, the talented forward hit one of the very worst penalty kicks ever and sent the ball far into the upper decks much to the relief and enjoyment of the Colombian fans. In the last ten minutes Colombia pressed forward, with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos even tweeting encouragement to Los Cafeteros, to no avail. 

The glaring Neymar miss and ensuing 1-1 result left the Colombian fans energized and enjoying the party atmosphere in the parking lot following the match. Most viewed the 1-1 draw over mighty Brazil as a de facto victory. For the dejected Brazil supporters, the opposite seemed true. 

Just a week after the match, Brazilian coach Mano Menezes was sacked by the Brazilian Football Federation as they try to do everything they can to ensure a Cup win on home soil in an attempt to vanquish the longstanding ghosts of the 1950 Maracanazo. Anything less than triumphantly hoisting the World Cup at the Maracanã in 2014 would not only be a failure, but a pronounced crisis of national identity. 

Load More