9th July 2014

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9th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 

4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City

For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.

The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.

A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.

We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 

The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.

An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     

Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 

The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 

Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 

As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 

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3rd July 2014

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3rd July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 

World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 

30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  

Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.

As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.  

Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).

From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.

This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.

Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 

 ·  1 notes

1st July 2014

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1st July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       

World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 

29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria

Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 

The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.

At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.

Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.

After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.

Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.

The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.

Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       

 ·  1 notes

23rd June 2014

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23rd June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  
World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  
World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  
World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  
World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  
World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  
World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  
World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 
18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria
With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 
The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.
With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.
And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.
The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  

World Cup 2014.  Croatia 4 - Cameroon 0 

18 June 2014, 6:00 pm. Veslo, Astoria

With over 120,000 Croatians in the Metro NYC area, and the community centered in Astoria since migration flows accelerated during the Yugoslavian civil war in the 1990’s, we knew this was the neighborhood to catch a Vatreni match alongside their local fans. 

The local Croatian eatery, Veslo, in Astoria, Queens was jammed packed with fan rocking red and white checkered jerseys and swilling Karlovackos accompanied by shots of Pelinkovac. Upon arrival, we stood tucked into a corner watching plates of fried calamari and grilled octopus being ferried to hungry guests.

With moody star striker Samual Eto’o on the sidelines with a knee injury, the team in dispute over unpaid wages, and Alex Song’s seemingly random red card-garnering punch to Mandzukic, Cameroon was in shambles and there for the taking by a talented Croatian team.

And so it goes, Croatia began its capitalization of the advantage and thoroughly demolished the infighting Cameroonians with a 4-0 victory.

The fans in Veslo were ecstatic as each of the four goals that hit the back of the net. A certain confidence boost as the Vatreni stand toe to toe with Mexico in the fight for Group A progression.  

20th June 2014

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20th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 
18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria
True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  
The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  
The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  
The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 
World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 
18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria
True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  
The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  
The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  
The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 
World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 
18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria
True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  
The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  
The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  
The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 
World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 
18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria
True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  
The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  
The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  
The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 
World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 
18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria
True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  
The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  
The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  
The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 
World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 
18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria
True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  
The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  
The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  
The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 
World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 
18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria
True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  
The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  
The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  
The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 

World Cup 2014.  Chile 2 - Spain 0 

18 June 2014, 3:00 pm. San Antonio Bakery II, Astoria

True to its name, El Completo is a Chilean hotdog with a thick spread of guacamole followed by layer of pebre and topped off with a run of mayonnaise (an option of mustard is on the table if you so desire). El Completo does not go halfway; it is only limited by the dimensions of its bun. On Wednesday at San Antonio Bakery II in Astoria, patrons gathered around a single television to see if La Roja would prove to be some basic, two part ketchup/mustard or epitomize their denizen dog.  

The bakery was filled with New York City’s Red-clad Chilean community, who seemed tense and muted with anticipation of their match-up with Spain. However, in the 20th minute, the bakery went from solemn to uproar as Eduardo Vargas dodged a tackle from Casillas and found space to secure a one goal lead.  

The first half was soon to a close when a wobbly Casillas decidedly punched a free kick into the path of Aranguiz, who expertly trapped the ball under his right foot and with one snap of the outside of the same foot, sent the pelota curving to the back of the net. The screech of the bakery’s chairs echoed in unison and the floor seemed to rise with the fans jumping for joy.  

The second half began as tense as the first, with the crowd wisely non-celebratory as the proverbial fat-lady had not yet sung. Alas, she did sing in the end and the Cup holders struggled to gain their footing and come back from elimination. For the Chileans, both in Brazil and Astoria, they will certainly be tested by the strengths of van Persie and Robben, but can look forward to delicious progression to the next round regardless. 

 ·  5 notes

20th June 2014

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20th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 
17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria
Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…
"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 
"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."
"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 0 - Mexico 0 

17 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Studio Square, Astoria

Special report from our Brazilian correspondent in the Brazilian section of Queens providing us with updates during Brazil’s disappointing 0-0 draw with Mexico…

"Everyone here is gorgeous and one older Brazilian woman was yelling in Portuguese that the press was taking too many booty pics, saying "you see the spirit we have? We have more to offer the world than the butt!" 

"One couple here is divided in their futbol allegiances. One rooting for Brazil, the other for Mexico. I asked what will happen if there is no tie in the match. They said, "that’s ok… then one of us will be happy and that happiness will please the other."

"The Mexican fans are screaming "sí se puede!," to which we are all responding "não você não pode!" 

1st February 2013

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1st February 2013

Africa Cup of Nations. Morocco 2 - South Africa 
27 January 2013, 12:00 pm. Casa Lounge, Astoria Queens
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens is home to the largest Moroccan population in New York City and Casa Lounge, a Moroccan-owned hookah spot, has been the undisputed destination in the neighborhood to catch Morocco’s Africa Cup of Nations matches this year.
Needing a win to progress out of a surprisingly competitive Group A, the Atlas Lions came out strong against a South African side needing at least a draw. Morocco opened the scoring after Issam El Adoua’s header capitalized on some sloppy South African defending in the 10th minute.
As it bounced over the line, the early goal seemed to catch the awestruck Moroccan fans in Queens, at least 75 strong, a bit off guard. Their joy was palpable immediately however, with national team kit-bedecked fans unfurling large red Morocco flags, chanting “wal Maghrib, wal Maghrib” and kissing each other while pointing to the heavens in gratitude.
Unfortunately, a bit of the celebratory momentum was lost when Casa Lounge’s Arabic satellite TV feed went down half way through the first half. A frustrating “channel error connection failed” message hovered ominously over the proceedings as concerned Moroccan fans took to their cell phones in hopes of not missing any of the action in between sips of extortionist-priced $5 mint teas.
Thankfully, the satellite feed came back a few minutes into the second half shortly before May Mahlangu’s composed curling finish from the top of the box in the 71st minute leveled the proceedings in Durban and scaled-up the blood pressure of the Moroccan fans in Queens.
Fate’s cruel twists continued for the Moroccans as they first went back ahead 2-1 after substitute Abdelilah Hafid’s late 82nd minute strike sent the fans on Steinway Street into a rapturous celebration just as the feeble Arabic satellite feed went out once again.
Only four minutes later, however, with many fans nervously pushed into the back of Casa Lounge hoping to catch a glimpse of the reserve internet feed, only available on one of the TVs by this point, South Africa tied the match with Siyabonga Sangweni’s clutch 86th minute bending effort.
The goal effectively sent South Africa through and broke Moroccan hearts. One man at Casa Lounge spiked his mint tea in disgust, and profanity-lanced Arabic diatribes filled the air in Queens as teary knocked-out Moroccan players collapsed on the pitch in Durban.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations. Morocco 2 - South Africa 
27 January 2013, 12:00 pm. Casa Lounge, Astoria Queens
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens is home to the largest Moroccan population in New York City and Casa Lounge, a Moroccan-owned hookah spot, has been the undisputed destination in the neighborhood to catch Morocco’s Africa Cup of Nations matches this year.
Needing a win to progress out of a surprisingly competitive Group A, the Atlas Lions came out strong against a South African side needing at least a draw. Morocco opened the scoring after Issam El Adoua’s header capitalized on some sloppy South African defending in the 10th minute.
As it bounced over the line, the early goal seemed to catch the awestruck Moroccan fans in Queens, at least 75 strong, a bit off guard. Their joy was palpable immediately however, with national team kit-bedecked fans unfurling large red Morocco flags, chanting “wal Maghrib, wal Maghrib” and kissing each other while pointing to the heavens in gratitude.
Unfortunately, a bit of the celebratory momentum was lost when Casa Lounge’s Arabic satellite TV feed went down half way through the first half. A frustrating “channel error connection failed” message hovered ominously over the proceedings as concerned Moroccan fans took to their cell phones in hopes of not missing any of the action in between sips of extortionist-priced $5 mint teas.
Thankfully, the satellite feed came back a few minutes into the second half shortly before May Mahlangu’s composed curling finish from the top of the box in the 71st minute leveled the proceedings in Durban and scaled-up the blood pressure of the Moroccan fans in Queens.
Fate’s cruel twists continued for the Moroccans as they first went back ahead 2-1 after substitute Abdelilah Hafid’s late 82nd minute strike sent the fans on Steinway Street into a rapturous celebration just as the feeble Arabic satellite feed went out once again.
Only four minutes later, however, with many fans nervously pushed into the back of Casa Lounge hoping to catch a glimpse of the reserve internet feed, only available on one of the TVs by this point, South Africa tied the match with Siyabonga Sangweni’s clutch 86th minute bending effort.
The goal effectively sent South Africa through and broke Moroccan hearts. One man at Casa Lounge spiked his mint tea in disgust, and profanity-lanced Arabic diatribes filled the air in Queens as teary knocked-out Moroccan players collapsed on the pitch in Durban.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations. Morocco 2 - South Africa 
27 January 2013, 12:00 pm. Casa Lounge, Astoria Queens
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens is home to the largest Moroccan population in New York City and Casa Lounge, a Moroccan-owned hookah spot, has been the undisputed destination in the neighborhood to catch Morocco’s Africa Cup of Nations matches this year.
Needing a win to progress out of a surprisingly competitive Group A, the Atlas Lions came out strong against a South African side needing at least a draw. Morocco opened the scoring after Issam El Adoua’s header capitalized on some sloppy South African defending in the 10th minute.
As it bounced over the line, the early goal seemed to catch the awestruck Moroccan fans in Queens, at least 75 strong, a bit off guard. Their joy was palpable immediately however, with national team kit-bedecked fans unfurling large red Morocco flags, chanting “wal Maghrib, wal Maghrib” and kissing each other while pointing to the heavens in gratitude.
Unfortunately, a bit of the celebratory momentum was lost when Casa Lounge’s Arabic satellite TV feed went down half way through the first half. A frustrating “channel error connection failed” message hovered ominously over the proceedings as concerned Moroccan fans took to their cell phones in hopes of not missing any of the action in between sips of extortionist-priced $5 mint teas.
Thankfully, the satellite feed came back a few minutes into the second half shortly before May Mahlangu’s composed curling finish from the top of the box in the 71st minute leveled the proceedings in Durban and scaled-up the blood pressure of the Moroccan fans in Queens.
Fate’s cruel twists continued for the Moroccans as they first went back ahead 2-1 after substitute Abdelilah Hafid’s late 82nd minute strike sent the fans on Steinway Street into a rapturous celebration just as the feeble Arabic satellite feed went out once again.
Only four minutes later, however, with many fans nervously pushed into the back of Casa Lounge hoping to catch a glimpse of the reserve internet feed, only available on one of the TVs by this point, South Africa tied the match with Siyabonga Sangweni’s clutch 86th minute bending effort.
The goal effectively sent South Africa through and broke Moroccan hearts. One man at Casa Lounge spiked his mint tea in disgust, and profanity-lanced Arabic diatribes filled the air in Queens as teary knocked-out Moroccan players collapsed on the pitch in Durban.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations. Morocco 2 - South Africa 
27 January 2013, 12:00 pm. Casa Lounge, Astoria Queens
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens is home to the largest Moroccan population in New York City and Casa Lounge, a Moroccan-owned hookah spot, has been the undisputed destination in the neighborhood to catch Morocco’s Africa Cup of Nations matches this year.
Needing a win to progress out of a surprisingly competitive Group A, the Atlas Lions came out strong against a South African side needing at least a draw. Morocco opened the scoring after Issam El Adoua’s header capitalized on some sloppy South African defending in the 10th minute.
As it bounced over the line, the early goal seemed to catch the awestruck Moroccan fans in Queens, at least 75 strong, a bit off guard. Their joy was palpable immediately however, with national team kit-bedecked fans unfurling large red Morocco flags, chanting “wal Maghrib, wal Maghrib” and kissing each other while pointing to the heavens in gratitude.
Unfortunately, a bit of the celebratory momentum was lost when Casa Lounge’s Arabic satellite TV feed went down half way through the first half. A frustrating “channel error connection failed” message hovered ominously over the proceedings as concerned Moroccan fans took to their cell phones in hopes of not missing any of the action in between sips of extortionist-priced $5 mint teas.
Thankfully, the satellite feed came back a few minutes into the second half shortly before May Mahlangu’s composed curling finish from the top of the box in the 71st minute leveled the proceedings in Durban and scaled-up the blood pressure of the Moroccan fans in Queens.
Fate’s cruel twists continued for the Moroccans as they first went back ahead 2-1 after substitute Abdelilah Hafid’s late 82nd minute strike sent the fans on Steinway Street into a rapturous celebration just as the feeble Arabic satellite feed went out once again.
Only four minutes later, however, with many fans nervously pushed into the back of Casa Lounge hoping to catch a glimpse of the reserve internet feed, only available on one of the TVs by this point, South Africa tied the match with Siyabonga Sangweni’s clutch 86th minute bending effort.
The goal effectively sent South Africa through and broke Moroccan hearts. One man at Casa Lounge spiked his mint tea in disgust, and profanity-lanced Arabic diatribes filled the air in Queens as teary knocked-out Moroccan players collapsed on the pitch in Durban.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country
Africa Cup of Nations. Morocco 2 - South Africa 
27 January 2013, 12:00 pm. Casa Lounge, Astoria Queens
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens is home to the largest Moroccan population in New York City and Casa Lounge, a Moroccan-owned hookah spot, has been the undisputed destination in the neighborhood to catch Morocco’s Africa Cup of Nations matches this year.
Needing a win to progress out of a surprisingly competitive Group A, the Atlas Lions came out strong against a South African side needing at least a draw. Morocco opened the scoring after Issam El Adoua’s header capitalized on some sloppy South African defending in the 10th minute.
As it bounced over the line, the early goal seemed to catch the awestruck Moroccan fans in Queens, at least 75 strong, a bit off guard. Their joy was palpable immediately however, with national team kit-bedecked fans unfurling large red Morocco flags, chanting “wal Maghrib, wal Maghrib” and kissing each other while pointing to the heavens in gratitude.
Unfortunately, a bit of the celebratory momentum was lost when Casa Lounge’s Arabic satellite TV feed went down half way through the first half. A frustrating “channel error connection failed” message hovered ominously over the proceedings as concerned Moroccan fans took to their cell phones in hopes of not missing any of the action in between sips of extortionist-priced $5 mint teas.
Thankfully, the satellite feed came back a few minutes into the second half shortly before May Mahlangu’s composed curling finish from the top of the box in the 71st minute leveled the proceedings in Durban and scaled-up the blood pressure of the Moroccan fans in Queens.
Fate’s cruel twists continued for the Moroccans as they first went back ahead 2-1 after substitute Abdelilah Hafid’s late 82nd minute strike sent the fans on Steinway Street into a rapturous celebration just as the feeble Arabic satellite feed went out once again.
Only four minutes later, however, with many fans nervously pushed into the back of Casa Lounge hoping to catch a glimpse of the reserve internet feed, only available on one of the TVs by this point, South Africa tied the match with Siyabonga Sangweni’s clutch 86th minute bending effort.
The goal effectively sent South Africa through and broke Moroccan hearts. One man at Casa Lounge spiked his mint tea in disgust, and profanity-lanced Arabic diatribes filled the air in Queens as teary knocked-out Moroccan players collapsed on the pitch in Durban.
Cross-posted to Africa is a Country

Africa Cup of Nations. Morocco 2 - South Africa 

27 January 2013, 12:00 pm. Casa Lounge, Astoria Queens

Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens is home to the largest Moroccan population in New York City and Casa Lounge, a Moroccan-owned hookah spot, has been the undisputed destination in the neighborhood to catch Morocco’s Africa Cup of Nations matches this year.

Needing a win to progress out of a surprisingly competitive Group A, the Atlas Lions came out strong against a South African side needing at least a draw. Morocco opened the scoring after Issam El Adoua’s header capitalized on some sloppy South African defending in the 10th minute.

As it bounced over the line, the early goal seemed to catch the awestruck Moroccan fans in Queens, at least 75 strong, a bit off guard. Their joy was palpable immediately however, with national team kit-bedecked fans unfurling large red Morocco flags, chanting “wal Maghrib, wal Maghrib” and kissing each other while pointing to the heavens in gratitude.

Unfortunately, a bit of the celebratory momentum was lost when Casa Lounge’s Arabic satellite TV feed went down half way through the first half. A frustrating “channel error connection failed” message hovered ominously over the proceedings as concerned Moroccan fans took to their cell phones in hopes of not missing any of the action in between sips of extortionist-priced $5 mint teas.

Thankfully, the satellite feed came back a few minutes into the second half shortly before May Mahlangu’s composed curling finish from the top of the box in the 71st minute leveled the proceedings in Durban and scaled-up the blood pressure of the Moroccan fans in Queens.

Fate’s cruel twists continued for the Moroccans as they first went back ahead 2-1 after substitute Abdelilah Hafid’s late 82nd minute strike sent the fans on Steinway Street into a rapturous celebration just as the feeble Arabic satellite feed went out once again.

Only four minutes later, however, with many fans nervously pushed into the back of Casa Lounge hoping to catch a glimpse of the reserve internet feed, only available on one of the TVs by this point, South Africa tied the match with Siyabonga Sangweni’s clutch 86th minute bending effort.

The goal effectively sent South Africa through and broke Moroccan hearts. One man at Casa Lounge spiked his mint tea in disgust, and profanity-lanced Arabic diatribes filled the air in Queens as teary knocked-out Moroccan players collapsed on the pitch in Durban.

Cross-posted to Africa is a Country

 ·  1 notes

12th December 2012

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12th December 2012

Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 
Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 
Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 
Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 
Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 
Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 
Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 
Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2
9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens
The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.
Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.
The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   
At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 

Derby of Eternal Enemies. Olympiacos FC 2 - Panathinaikos FC 2

9 December 2012, 12:30 pm. Olympiacos FC Supporters Club NY, Astoria Queens

The incredibly heated Greek match pitting Olympiacos FC against Panathinaikos FC is also known as both the “Derby of the Eternal Enemies” or “The Mother of All Battles.” These descriptions are rather apt, especially considering some recent matches, and capture the enduring rivalry and the emotions wrapped up in it. The derby between the Red-Whites and the Greens is a social, cultural, and regional rivalry. Both of these teams are the two major clubs in Greece. Panathinaikos FC (PAO) was founded in 1908 and is located in the center of Athens. PAO is one of only two supporter-owned football clubs in Greece. They are considered the classic representative of the old upper class society of Athens.

Olympiacos FC, founded in 1925 and located in the port city of Piraeus, just outside central Athens, represents the working class citizens of the city. Olympiacos is the most successful club in Greek football history winning 39 league titles. Both fan bases hate each other whenever they meet regardless of if it is in Athens or in Astoria.

The Olympiacos FC Supporters club has been in New York for 16 years. Located on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens conveniently above the Acropolis Meat Market, the members only fan club has been central to the large community of Greek immigrants living in Astoria. It was filled on a recent Sunday afternoon for the Derby with Greek men drinking coffee and cheering on their team. The atmosphere was amazing and became even better after Olympiacos scored two first half goals after being one down to take a 2-1 lead before the break. Panathinaikos leveled in the 67th, but the draw didn’t dampen the mood too much among the Olympiacos fans as they sit comfortably at the top of the league and a massive 16 points ahead of their arch rival.   

At the Olympiacos supports club, after we assured them we were not undercover FBI agents, we even had the opportunity to sit in the VIP section that included a small office and one flat screen TV after being invited by George (the club’s main caretaker/one of the head honchos) and Alex (an avid supporter). A special thanks goes out to both of them for their gracious hospitality during the Derby of Eternal Enemies. 

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