1st July 2014

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1st July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       

World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 

29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria

Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 

The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.

At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.

Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.

After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.

Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.

The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.

Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       

 ·  1 notes

If, as Paul Auster once wrote, “Countries now wage their battles on the soccer field with surrogate armies in short pants,” then Brazil 2014 represents a new battle for Greece. One that at a time of crisis carries an importance that transcends beyond the limits of the soccer field; one that can transform fear and pessimism back into hope and enthusiasm, two of the elements that pushed the underdogs of Euro 2004 into becoming champions.

- Achilles Kallergis, Greek fans hope to relive 2004

30th June 2014

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30th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 
World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 
28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights
Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.
With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 
Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 
Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 
Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 

World Cup 2014.  Colombia 2 - Uruguay 0 

28 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Roosevelt Avenue, Jackson Heights

Colombia’s emphatic win over Uruguay caused the streets in Queens to explode in a carnival of celebrations on Saturday.

With thousands upon thousands of revelers who had just born witness to James Rodríguez’s golazo of the Copa triumphantly emerging from the restaurants, bars, clubs, cumbia-blasting billiard halls, bakeries, and bodegas, Roosevelt Avenue was effectively transformed into a gargantuan open air street party. 

Banned-in-Colombia corn flour was launched through the air, Q32 buses were forced out of their lanes, men were surfing on SUVs, and flags were waved out of countless windows as a clamor of air horns, vuvuzelas, and honking cars filled the air for hours alongside vallenato tracks booming out of shoulder-mounted speakers. 

Amazingly, these celebrations were not limited to Jackson Heights. Across the borough on Steinway street, at the exact same moment following the historic victory, Colombia (and a few Brazil) fans filled the street in celebration, blocking an unmarked cop car and introducing NYC’s finest to the wonders of the vuvuzela. 

Queens will certainly be the place to be once again for Friday’s clutch Colombia vs. Brazil quarterfinal match. 

 ·  31 notes

24th June 2014

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24th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  
World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 
21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx
The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 
Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  
At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.
After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 
Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.
Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   
Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  

World Cup 2014.  Ghana 2 - Germany 2 

21 June 2014, 3:00 pm. Papaye Restaurant, The Bronx

The Ghanaian fans were out in force on Saturday on Grand Concourse in the Bronx to cheer on the Black Stars in their clutch Group G match with Germany. 

Multiple story lines added to the intrigue of the fixture, most notably the rematch of Boateng vs Boateng, the two Ghanaian-German brothers who grew up in the same house in Berlin and now play for opposing national teams in their second World Cup clash.  

At Papaye restaurant in the Bronx, Ghanaians, a handful of Americans donning Black Stars shirts, and a MLS film crew all packed into the small space as malt ginger beers, pear ciders, and chicken and rice plates were dolled out from the kitchen’s overstretched staff.

After going down 1-0 in the 51st minute following Mario Götze’s strike, Ghana began maintaining better possession and tied it up just ten minutes later through André Ayew’s header. This sent the fans at Papaye into fierce celebrations, with one fan ripping off his shirt, standing on a table, and giving a military salute. 

Then, in the 63rd minute, Ghana’s talented striker and sometime music video star, Asamoah “Baby Jet” Gyan, broke through on a counter attack and unleashed a powerful far post goal that nearly brought down the roof in this Bronx eatery.

Flags were flown with pride, strangers lept into each others’ arms, and high fives and cheers echoed throughout while random passerbys on Grand Concourse even popped their heads in to see what all the commotion was about.   

Ghana’s fans in NYC proved to be some of the classiest we have encountered in our World Cup travels-around-the-city thus far, with impressive non-stop singing and dancing the entire match, even while down, and even after conceding the heartbreaking late German equalizer.  

 ·  3 notes

24th June 2014

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24th June 2014

World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 
World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 
21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst
In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.
Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 
Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.
From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         
All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.
Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture. 
Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 
All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 

World Cup 2014.  Argentina 1 - Iran 0 

21 June 2014, 12:00 pm. Boca Juniors Steakhouse, Elmhurst

In Elmhurst, the Argentinian section of Queens, there is one soccer-viewing establishment that rises above the rest in terms of passion, emotion, atmosphere, and fervor.

Boca Juniors Steakhouse on Queens Boulevard is the undeniable La Albiceleste cathedral for the Argentinian expatriate community in NYC. 

Indeed, alongside the walls covered with Argentinian soccer icons such as Diego Maradona, Juan Román Riquelme, Claudio Caniggia, conspicuously-absent-from-the-Cup Carlos Tevez, and the country’s current messiah, Leo Messi, religious imagery was everywhere.

From the framed Papa Francisco photo hung next to the flat screen TVs for fans to gaze at for a bit of extra luck as the game was underway, to the row of women in the front of the restaurant praying for a goal from the 80th minute onward, to small children crossing themselves in Queens for Argentinian success on the field in Brazil, Catholicism was intrinsically interlinked with the large grilled steaks, bottles of malbec, and tres leches cakes flying out of the kitchen on Saturday during Argentina’s tense encounter with Iran.         

All of this would come in handy in the dying minutes of the match as the disappointment of drawing with an organized Iranian team was nearing fruition and the Argentinians in Queens were calling out to the heavens for a miracle on the pitch in Belo Horizonte.

Then, in the 91st minute, Leo Messi made one of his trademark runs cutting in from the right side to unleash a left foot rocket into the side netting, winning the match for La Albiceleste and sending the Argentinians in Queens into a joyous rapture.

Women stood on table tops and cried. Old men got down on their knees to thank higher powers. Tough-looking waiters embraced each other. Flags were waved. Songs were sung. Papa Francisco was smiling. 

All was well in Queens’ preeminent house of futbol worship. 

 ·  11 notes

Maradona, Che Guevara, Perón and the Dirty War all come together in the country’s World Cup hopes. …No surprise, then, that politics is ever-present in Argentinian football – a point re-emphasized recently when Alejandro Sabella, coach of the national team, declared himself a revolutionary in the tradition of populist former president Juan Perón, lambasting the rich and urging a redistribution of wealth to offset social inequalities.

 ·  1 notes
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