16th July 2014

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16th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  
World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  
World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  
World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 
9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square
The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.
Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 
It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.
And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.
La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  

World Cup 2014.  Holland 0 - Argentina 0 (2-4 on PKs) 

9 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Tonic/Hurley’s Saloon, Times Square

The acclaimed Holland supporters’ bar in NYC is Tonic in Times Square. We arrived two hours early for the showdown against Argentina, but this course of action still did not grant us enough time to get in as the orange clad line was already stretched down the block.

Tonic’s Facebook page thankfully directed us to an alternative viewing locale around the corner, and we nestled in to a tense and strangely quiet atmosphere as the Dutch watched their compatriots face the Argentinians. 

It is no secret that this was one of the most arduous, if not boring, match of the entire World Cup. In fact, it was the only match, where we felt confident to use the lavatory during the game with no fear of missing crucial action. The tireless efforts of a perpetually-flopping Robben or triple-teamed Messi were no match against the ennui that seemed to slow the minutes of regulation and extra time.

And, if that was not enough strain for the Dutch angst in the room, the match was pushed to penalty kicks. The win ultimately came as a result of Argentina’s hero-keeper Sergio Romero and the heart and deep, painful defensive sacrifices, of Javier Mascherano.

La Albiceleste’s confidence was thus sealed and they went on to complete all their shots, sending themselves into the ultimate match of the Cup and setting up a rematch of the ‘86 and ‘90 finals against Germany.  

 ·  1 notes

16th July 2014

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16th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.
World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 
8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay
We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.
With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.
Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.
The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.
We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.

World Cup 2014.  Germany 7 - Brazil 1 

8 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Zum Schneider Outdoor Viewing Party, Kips Bay

We stood in a parking lot adjacent to the East River, which was renovated to a biergarten by the German restaurant Zum Schneider, who even have their own soccer club the Zum Schneider FC in the local Metro Soccer League here in NYC. It proved to be an ideal viewing party for the macabre scenes that soon unfolded on the Brazilians as the Germans tactfully demonstrated their might upon a weakened Seleção.

With delicious brats bathed in spicy mustard and tall Wurzburgers in hand, we stood in anticipation alongside a gaggle of German fans to see how the Brazilians would overcome the physiological trauma of losing Neymar to a cracked spine and the suspension of their crucial defensive stalwart Thiago Silva.

Let’s be honest, Brazil’s home advantage and emotional volatility carried them into the round of 16. Each match they faced seemed to be an uphill struggle. The last time Brazil was shocked so badly in defeat was the Maracanazo, the famous 2-1 loss to Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final, which seemingly pales in comparison to what was about to transpire in front of us.

The agony truly began during the buildup to third goal, as it happened so quickly that the Zum Schneider crowd initially mistook it for a replay, as they had not even finished celebrating Klose’s previous goal. And, the goals proceeded to rain into the Brazilian net from there… thus paving the way for Germany in the 2014 World Cup semi-finals and the collective emotional shock of the host nation.

We witnessed history. We witnessed the Brazilian pain and tears of the Minerazo alongside the cheers of the jubilant Germans in NYC.

 ·  2 notes

This mélange of Germanic power and multiethnic prowess derives from the soccer academy system, which was overhauled a decade ago to not just create finishing schools for talented teens, but as a means of integrating foreign styles and attitudes into German culture … (and) the drafting of revised immigration laws in 2000 signaled a cultural shift that spread to soccer once foreign flair began to flood the academies.

- James Tyler, The New Germans
 ·  1 notes

9th July 2014

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9th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 
World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 
4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City
For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.
The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.
A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.
We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 
The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.
An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     
Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 
The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 
Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 
As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 

World Cup 2014.  Brazil 2 - Colombia 1 

4 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Beija-Flor Restaurant, Long Island City

For Brazil’s clutch quarterfinal match against a flying Colombia, we headed to Beija-Flor Restaurant in the Brazilian-dominated area in Queens on the Long Island City/Astoria border.

The interior was packed an hour before kickoff, with yellow-clad fans of all ages standing between full tables and spilling out the door to watch the game on the large projector screen in the back of the festive restaurant.

A middle aged woman painted diminutive Brazilian flags on people’s faces as “eu sou brasileiro, com muito orgulho, com muito amor” (I’m Brazilian, with a lot of pride, with a lot of love) chants rang out.

We settled into our prime seats and proceeded to order passion fruit caipirinhas, skirt steaks, buckets of Brazilian beer, and delicious little salted cod croquettes from the overstretched yet incredibly friendly waitstaff as the game began, with both teams playing an extremely physical style where tactical fouls were frequently deployed from the start. 

The Brazilians in Queens were treated to a fortuitous beginning, with Thiago Silva scoring at the back post in the 7th minute after some sloppy defending.

An old man stood on his seat and pumped his fist with equal parts excitement and relief, a girl whipped out a concealed vuvuzela festooned with a Brazilian flag and blew it towards the heavens, and couples of all ages lovingly embraced.     

Shortly after the first goal, a full percussion section magically appeared in Beija-Flor’s standing-room-only entry way. They proceeded to play incredible Brazilian music (with a tambourine player rocking a yellow “jiu jitsu Dad” shirt even dipping into occasional spoken word match commentary in Portuguese) for the rest of the game, sidewalk halftime show included. This was easily one of our World Cup in NYC highlights over the past few weeks. 

The brutal fouling continued in the second half with the referee struggling to keep control of the match before David Luiz’s wonderful free kick smashed into the upper right corner of the net in the 69th, sending the Brazilians in Queens into full party mode. 

Colombia got one back in the 80th from James “player-of-the-tournament” Rodríguez and he was swiftly congratulated by a giant green bug, but it was too late for Los Cafeteros. 

As the final whistle sounded the party at Beija-Flor spilled onto the streets, carnival hats were passed around, cars waving Brazilian flags passed by sounding congratulatory air horns from their moon roofs, and elderly women sambaed to the sounds of the incredible five piece percussion section that never stopped playing. 

 ·  3 notes

7th July 2014

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7th July 2014

World Cup 2014.  USA 1 - Belgium 2 
1 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Governors Island Beach Club, Manhattan
“True champions aren’t always the ones that win, but those with the most guts.” - Mia Hamm
The USA found itself within this World Cup’s “Group of Death” and were supposedly doomed from the start. However, exactly thirty seconds into the must-win first game against Ghana, the African power that knocked us out both in 2006 and 2010, Clint Dempsey silenced all the critics, cynics, and skeptics with a brilliant individual run and left-foot finish. Thus, a new script was immediately written for the USA’s chances in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Americans, whether 5th generation or recently immigrated, were most likely raised on soccer in one form or the other. It is an ingrained sport within our culture despite our viewing of the global game not usually stacking up to our seasonal three course meal of football, basketball, and baseball.
This is changing, however. We can pontificate on those reasons for hours, but for now, it was an incredible experience the last few weeks to watch a great group of Americans play their hearts out— gaining new fans and unlikely plaudits along the way— even if it was largely our grit, guts, and work rate that, again, carried us to the round of 16.
The Governors Island Beach Club served as an excellent and quintessentially American venue— complete with beers, burgers, and the beach— to cheer on the Yanks in the knockout stages. From our seats we had the lower Manhattan skyline in view and this location served as an impressive backdrop as we watched the red, white, and blue take the field for Tuesday’s match-up against Belgium.
From the outset, the US was put on their back toes. Tim Howard proved himself to be world class, putting in one of the best goalkeeping performances in modern World Cup history, making a record-breaking 16 saves.
The Yanks continued to fight on even after two deflating extra time goals were scored by Belgium’s De Bruyne and Lukaku. Against all odds, a heroic comeback effort was kick-started shortly thereafter. In the 104th minute, 19-year-old substitute Julian Greene expertly scored a fantastic goal with his very first touch of the Cup, signalling a bright senior career and giving millions of American fans hope for the future.
See you in four. 
World Cup 2014.  USA 1 - Belgium 2 
1 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Governors Island Beach Club, Manhattan
“True champions aren’t always the ones that win, but those with the most guts.” - Mia Hamm
The USA found itself within this World Cup’s “Group of Death” and were supposedly doomed from the start. However, exactly thirty seconds into the must-win first game against Ghana, the African power that knocked us out both in 2006 and 2010, Clint Dempsey silenced all the critics, cynics, and skeptics with a brilliant individual run and left-foot finish. Thus, a new script was immediately written for the USA’s chances in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Americans, whether 5th generation or recently immigrated, were most likely raised on soccer in one form or the other. It is an ingrained sport within our culture despite our viewing of the global game not usually stacking up to our seasonal three course meal of football, basketball, and baseball.
This is changing, however. We can pontificate on those reasons for hours, but for now, it was an incredible experience the last few weeks to watch a great group of Americans play their hearts out— gaining new fans and unlikely plaudits along the way— even if it was largely our grit, guts, and work rate that, again, carried us to the round of 16.
The Governors Island Beach Club served as an excellent and quintessentially American venue— complete with beers, burgers, and the beach— to cheer on the Yanks in the knockout stages. From our seats we had the lower Manhattan skyline in view and this location served as an impressive backdrop as we watched the red, white, and blue take the field for Tuesday’s match-up against Belgium.
From the outset, the US was put on their back toes. Tim Howard proved himself to be world class, putting in one of the best goalkeeping performances in modern World Cup history, making a record-breaking 16 saves.
The Yanks continued to fight on even after two deflating extra time goals were scored by Belgium’s De Bruyne and Lukaku. Against all odds, a heroic comeback effort was kick-started shortly thereafter. In the 104th minute, 19-year-old substitute Julian Greene expertly scored a fantastic goal with his very first touch of the Cup, signalling a bright senior career and giving millions of American fans hope for the future.
See you in four. 
World Cup 2014.  USA 1 - Belgium 2 
1 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Governors Island Beach Club, Manhattan
“True champions aren’t always the ones that win, but those with the most guts.” - Mia Hamm
The USA found itself within this World Cup’s “Group of Death” and were supposedly doomed from the start. However, exactly thirty seconds into the must-win first game against Ghana, the African power that knocked us out both in 2006 and 2010, Clint Dempsey silenced all the critics, cynics, and skeptics with a brilliant individual run and left-foot finish. Thus, a new script was immediately written for the USA’s chances in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Americans, whether 5th generation or recently immigrated, were most likely raised on soccer in one form or the other. It is an ingrained sport within our culture despite our viewing of the global game not usually stacking up to our seasonal three course meal of football, basketball, and baseball.
This is changing, however. We can pontificate on those reasons for hours, but for now, it was an incredible experience the last few weeks to watch a great group of Americans play their hearts out— gaining new fans and unlikely plaudits along the way— even if it was largely our grit, guts, and work rate that, again, carried us to the round of 16.
The Governors Island Beach Club served as an excellent and quintessentially American venue— complete with beers, burgers, and the beach— to cheer on the Yanks in the knockout stages. From our seats we had the lower Manhattan skyline in view and this location served as an impressive backdrop as we watched the red, white, and blue take the field for Tuesday’s match-up against Belgium.
From the outset, the US was put on their back toes. Tim Howard proved himself to be world class, putting in one of the best goalkeeping performances in modern World Cup history, making a record-breaking 16 saves.
The Yanks continued to fight on even after two deflating extra time goals were scored by Belgium’s De Bruyne and Lukaku. Against all odds, a heroic comeback effort was kick-started shortly thereafter. In the 104th minute, 19-year-old substitute Julian Greene expertly scored a fantastic goal with his very first touch of the Cup, signalling a bright senior career and giving millions of American fans hope for the future.
See you in four. 
World Cup 2014.  USA 1 - Belgium 2 
1 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Governors Island Beach Club, Manhattan
“True champions aren’t always the ones that win, but those with the most guts.” - Mia Hamm
The USA found itself within this World Cup’s “Group of Death” and were supposedly doomed from the start. However, exactly thirty seconds into the must-win first game against Ghana, the African power that knocked us out both in 2006 and 2010, Clint Dempsey silenced all the critics, cynics, and skeptics with a brilliant individual run and left-foot finish. Thus, a new script was immediately written for the USA’s chances in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Americans, whether 5th generation or recently immigrated, were most likely raised on soccer in one form or the other. It is an ingrained sport within our culture despite our viewing of the global game not usually stacking up to our seasonal three course meal of football, basketball, and baseball.
This is changing, however. We can pontificate on those reasons for hours, but for now, it was an incredible experience the last few weeks to watch a great group of Americans play their hearts out— gaining new fans and unlikely plaudits along the way— even if it was largely our grit, guts, and work rate that, again, carried us to the round of 16.
The Governors Island Beach Club served as an excellent and quintessentially American venue— complete with beers, burgers, and the beach— to cheer on the Yanks in the knockout stages. From our seats we had the lower Manhattan skyline in view and this location served as an impressive backdrop as we watched the red, white, and blue take the field for Tuesday’s match-up against Belgium.
From the outset, the US was put on their back toes. Tim Howard proved himself to be world class, putting in one of the best goalkeeping performances in modern World Cup history, making a record-breaking 16 saves.
The Yanks continued to fight on even after two deflating extra time goals were scored by Belgium’s De Bruyne and Lukaku. Against all odds, a heroic comeback effort was kick-started shortly thereafter. In the 104th minute, 19-year-old substitute Julian Greene expertly scored a fantastic goal with his very first touch of the Cup, signalling a bright senior career and giving millions of American fans hope for the future.
See you in four. 
World Cup 2014.  USA 1 - Belgium 2 
1 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Governors Island Beach Club, Manhattan
“True champions aren’t always the ones that win, but those with the most guts.” - Mia Hamm
The USA found itself within this World Cup’s “Group of Death” and were supposedly doomed from the start. However, exactly thirty seconds into the must-win first game against Ghana, the African power that knocked us out both in 2006 and 2010, Clint Dempsey silenced all the critics, cynics, and skeptics with a brilliant individual run and left-foot finish. Thus, a new script was immediately written for the USA’s chances in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Americans, whether 5th generation or recently immigrated, were most likely raised on soccer in one form or the other. It is an ingrained sport within our culture despite our viewing of the global game not usually stacking up to our seasonal three course meal of football, basketball, and baseball.
This is changing, however. We can pontificate on those reasons for hours, but for now, it was an incredible experience the last few weeks to watch a great group of Americans play their hearts out— gaining new fans and unlikely plaudits along the way— even if it was largely our grit, guts, and work rate that, again, carried us to the round of 16.
The Governors Island Beach Club served as an excellent and quintessentially American venue— complete with beers, burgers, and the beach— to cheer on the Yanks in the knockout stages. From our seats we had the lower Manhattan skyline in view and this location served as an impressive backdrop as we watched the red, white, and blue take the field for Tuesday’s match-up against Belgium.
From the outset, the US was put on their back toes. Tim Howard proved himself to be world class, putting in one of the best goalkeeping performances in modern World Cup history, making a record-breaking 16 saves.
The Yanks continued to fight on even after two deflating extra time goals were scored by Belgium’s De Bruyne and Lukaku. Against all odds, a heroic comeback effort was kick-started shortly thereafter. In the 104th minute, 19-year-old substitute Julian Greene expertly scored a fantastic goal with his very first touch of the Cup, signalling a bright senior career and giving millions of American fans hope for the future.
See you in four. 
World Cup 2014.  USA 1 - Belgium 2 
1 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Governors Island Beach Club, Manhattan
“True champions aren’t always the ones that win, but those with the most guts.” - Mia Hamm
The USA found itself within this World Cup’s “Group of Death” and were supposedly doomed from the start. However, exactly thirty seconds into the must-win first game against Ghana, the African power that knocked us out both in 2006 and 2010, Clint Dempsey silenced all the critics, cynics, and skeptics with a brilliant individual run and left-foot finish. Thus, a new script was immediately written for the USA’s chances in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Americans, whether 5th generation or recently immigrated, were most likely raised on soccer in one form or the other. It is an ingrained sport within our culture despite our viewing of the global game not usually stacking up to our seasonal three course meal of football, basketball, and baseball.
This is changing, however. We can pontificate on those reasons for hours, but for now, it was an incredible experience the last few weeks to watch a great group of Americans play their hearts out— gaining new fans and unlikely plaudits along the way— even if it was largely our grit, guts, and work rate that, again, carried us to the round of 16.
The Governors Island Beach Club served as an excellent and quintessentially American venue— complete with beers, burgers, and the beach— to cheer on the Yanks in the knockout stages. From our seats we had the lower Manhattan skyline in view and this location served as an impressive backdrop as we watched the red, white, and blue take the field for Tuesday’s match-up against Belgium.
From the outset, the US was put on their back toes. Tim Howard proved himself to be world class, putting in one of the best goalkeeping performances in modern World Cup history, making a record-breaking 16 saves.
The Yanks continued to fight on even after two deflating extra time goals were scored by Belgium’s De Bruyne and Lukaku. Against all odds, a heroic comeback effort was kick-started shortly thereafter. In the 104th minute, 19-year-old substitute Julian Greene expertly scored a fantastic goal with his very first touch of the Cup, signalling a bright senior career and giving millions of American fans hope for the future.
See you in four. 

World Cup 2014.  USA 1 - Belgium 2 

1 July 2014, 4:00 pm. Governors Island Beach Club, Manhattan

True champions aren’t always the ones that win, but those with the most guts. - Mia Hamm

The USA found itself within this World Cup’s “Group of Death” and were supposedly doomed from the start. However, exactly thirty seconds into the must-win first game against Ghana, the African power that knocked us out both in 2006 and 2010, Clint Dempsey silenced all the critics, cynics, and skeptics with a brilliant individual run and left-foot finish. Thus, a new script was immediately written for the USA’s chances in the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

Americans, whether 5th generation or recently immigrated, were most likely raised on soccer in one form or the other. It is an ingrained sport within our culture despite our viewing of the global game not usually stacking up to our seasonal three course meal of football, basketball, and baseball.

This is changing, however. We can pontificate on those reasons for hours, but for now, it was an incredible experience the last few weeks to watch a great group of Americans play their hearts out— gaining new fans and unlikely plaudits along the way— even if it was largely our grit, guts, and work rate that, again, carried us to the round of 16.

The Governors Island Beach Club served as an excellent and quintessentially American venue— complete with beers, burgers, and the beach— to cheer on the Yanks in the knockout stages. From our seats we had the lower Manhattan skyline in view and this location served as an impressive backdrop as we watched the red, white, and blue take the field for Tuesday’s match-up against Belgium.

From the outset, the US was put on their back toes. Tim Howard proved himself to be world class, putting in one of the best goalkeeping performances in modern World Cup history, making a record-breaking 16 saves.

The Yanks continued to fight on even after two deflating extra time goals were scored by Belgium’s De Bruyne and Lukaku. Against all odds, a heroic comeback effort was kick-started shortly thereafter. In the 104th minute, 19-year-old substitute Julian Greene expertly scored a fantastic goal with his very first touch of the Cup, signalling a bright senior career and giving millions of American fans hope for the future.

See you in four. 

 ·  3 notes

3rd July 2014

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3rd July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 
World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 
30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  
Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.
As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.   
Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).
From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.
This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.
Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 

World Cup 2014.  Algeria 1 - Germany 2 

30 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Café Borbone, Astoria  

Steinway Street in Astoria, Queens, houses a variety of Arabic restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, and mosques along its corridors. One Algerian hangout along this route, Café Borbone, is an unsuspecting Italian café, where mostly men come to gather, sip espresso, and munch on the various Italian pastries. It has also become the chosen futbol destination for the local Algerian community in Astoria as the vast majority of the other establishments on the block are Egyptian, Lebanese, or Moroccan owned.

As we entered, we discovered this location to be one of the most impassioned fan-hangouts in our travels during this World Cup in New York City.  

Upon moving to the boisterous back-room, Les Fennecs fans were loud, smacking their hands on the table, and one individual was so upset by another’s comment that they needed to be physically separated in order to not allow the situation to further escalate (keep in mind; the national anthems hadn’t even begun yet).

From the start, the Algerians brought a superb challenge to the favorited Germans with a needed aggressiveness coupled with cool-heads and smart offensive play using precision long balls to the wings to stretch the German defense.

This rivalry can be traced back to 1982 World Cup in Spain, where the Germans barely entertained the idea of losing to the Foxes, but were thoroughly silenced with a 1-0 Algerian victory before colluding with the Austrians for a manufactured result, knocking Algeria out. Proof that statistics, odds, and seasoned play are at times no match for the unquantifiable factors of tenacity and grit that the World Cup exemplifies so well.

Unfortunately, for our new friends over at Café Borbone, this was not to be repeated this year. Islam Slimani had an abundance of chances to score and only the tactful sweeper-keeping of Manuel Neuer stopped his efforts. With every missed opportunity several hands would come down on the table-tops with defibrillating smacks. Although the Fennec Foxes held their ground into extra-time, they were quickly silenced first by Andre Schürrle then by Ozil in the 120th. Abdelmoumene Djabou found a last-minute goal, but it was too late and they relinquished the field in what was to be a noble defeat. Shukran and arrivederci to our hosts. 

 ·  1 notes

They had decided to quit their current teams in order to create a new national team for the place of their birth: the French colony of Algeria. Before each game the flag of the Algerian revolution asserted that despite France’s refusal to accept its independence, the nation of Algeria truly did exist. So it was that Algeria’s first football team was born in a gesture of revolt.

 ·  3 notes

1st July 2014

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1st July 2014

World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       
World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 
29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria
Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 
The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.
At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.
Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.
After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.
Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.
The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.
Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       

World Cup 2014.  Greece 1 - Costa Rica 1 (3-5 on PKs) 

29 June 2014, 4:00 pm. Athens Cafe, Astoria

Greece fans in Astoria were out in droves on Sunday in Astoria to see Ethniki take on Costa Rica in an octavos de final match not many envisioned happening at the start of the tournament. 

The atmosphere around 30th Avenue was festive, with nearly every Greek cafe, restaurant, grocery store, and butcher shop packed with blue-clad fans draped in blue-white flags.

At Athens Cafe, the line wrapped around the block and fans jostled for sidewalk space to peer in and catch a glimpse of the action as frappés were nervously downed.

Greece fell behind after Brian Ruiz’s placement-not-power strike into the right corner in the 55th.

After a seemingly harsh red card to Oscar Duarte in the 66th, the Greece fans on 30th Avenue began to grow in their confidence and excitement as their players on the pitch attacked more than they did in the entire 2004 European Cup.

Their opening came at the death in regulation time, with Sokratis Papastathopoulos pursuing virtue with a last ditch 91st minute strike.

The fans in Astoria went wild and the entire Greek section of the borough was screaming its lungs out and found itself not only within a collective embrace, but on the cusp of something historic.

Alas, this was not too be, as the match went to penalty kicks and Costa Rica was flawless from the spot, hitting a perfect five for five and breaking so many Greek hearts in Queens.       

 ·  1 notes

If, as Paul Auster once wrote, “Countries now wage their battles on the soccer field with surrogate armies in short pants,” then Brazil 2014 represents a new battle for Greece. One that at a time of crisis carries an importance that transcends beyond the limits of the soccer field; one that can transform fear and pessimism back into hope and enthusiasm, two of the elements that pushed the underdogs of Euro 2004 into becoming champions.

- Achilles Kallergis, Greek fans hope to relive 2004
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